Sporting Schools - Quick Stix

DEMAND FOR SPORTING SCHOOLS ON THE RISE

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Image: The introduction of lacrosse this year has been very successful, with 59 programs delivered across five different states involving more than 3,500 students.

The Sporting Schools program is going from strength to strength with more than 6,500 schools across Australia being funded across the life of the program.

The program – designed to help schools increase children's participation in sport and to connect them with community sporting opportunities – has funded over 3,461,000 participants since its inception in Term 3, 2015.

Almost 3,000 schools - totalling more than 192,000 participants - were funded last term, with 219 new schools becoming involved in the Sporting Schools program for the first time.

In Term 1, 2018, the top five requested sports by primary schools were tennis, gymnastics, athletics, cricket and basketball; while for secondary schools it was athletics, tennis, netball, touch football, and cricket.

The introduction of lacrosse this year has been very successful, with 59 programs delivered across five different states involving more than 3,500 students.

Australian Lacrosse Association’s growth coordinator Damien Orr says the sport is thrilled with the Term 1 take-up.

“Lacrosse is the fastest game on two feet and the progressive learning program was well received by the Term 1 participants and coaches,” he says. “Our instructors have been excited to have the opportunity to teach Quick Stix Lacrosse nationwide and, judging by the excitement and bookings, we will be in many more schools in Term 2.”

He says Quick Stix is proving to be “a fun sport” for primary school children and “our early years programs have been some of our most successful”.

More than 3,390 primary schools across Australia have already received funding for Term 2, with funding having to close early due to the demand.

Traditionally the Australian Sports Commission’s Sporting Schools program distributes $7.1 million per term, however extra funding was needed to keep up with the demand.

Acting Director, National Program Operations Jamie Bradnam says it’s the first time demand has significantly outstripped funding.

“We were blown away by the demand from the very first day,” he says. “We had to keep a close eye on the requests as we were quickly reaching our capacity.”

 

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